Physiological Variables That Can Affect Blood

Categories: Phlebotomy

Are you considering a career in the field of Phlebotomy? As you begin your training and become familiar with the numerous processes and procedures of the job, you should also have an understanding of the various physiological variables that can affect a patient’s blood when collecting samples for testing. One of the more obvious variables to consider is the age of the patient. Compared with adults, newborns typically have higher values of red and white blood cells. Elderly patients may have higher levels of creatinine present in their blood samples, as kidney function tends to decline with age. Diet can also affect the composition of blood. A diet that includes foods with high sugar will produce high glucose levels in the blood that can last for several hours. A diet that includes a lot of fatty foods will increase the fat content in blood, making plasma appear cloudy. If the…

World Blood Donor Day

Categories: Phlebotomy

Phlebotomists of the world will have plenty of work to do on June 14 – this is World Blood Donor Day, a day celebrated each year to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products. This day also exists to build a worldwide culture of voluntary blood donation and thank those unpaid blood donors for their life-saving gifts of blood. In addition, World Blood Donor Day serves as a springboard for longer-term donor education programs and campaigns to strengthen blood transfusion services. This year celebrates the 10th anniversary of World Blood Donor Day and focuses on the huge value of donated blood to patients. Millions of lives are saved each year by the transfusion of blood and blood products. Blood transfusions help patients who are suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer with a higher quality of life. The slogan of World Blood Donor Day is “Give the…

Biohazard Exposure Prevention: Tips for Protecting Yourself

Categories: Phlebotomy

Professionals in the field of Phlebotomy have the responsibility of collecting samples of blood from patients. It is absolutely critical that Phlebotomists use caution – both for their own safety and the safety of others – when performing venipuncture in order to avoid exposure to blood-borne pathogens. During training, aspiring Phlebotomists learn a number of standard safety procedures and precautions that help protect them when performing their duties. These include needlestick precautions, how to handle spills, and proper needle disposal. Needlestick Precautions – If a Phlebotomist accidentally sticks him or herself with a contaminated needle, precautions must be taken to prevent the spread of infection. The Phlebotomist must first remove their gloves, and the site of the needlestick should be washed with soap and water while squeezing to promote bleeding. This is very important as it helps to flush the contaminate from the Phlebotomist’s system. The patient’s name and record…

Phlebotomy Equipment

Categories: Phlebotomy

When beginning your Phlebotomy training, it is crucial to familiarize yourself with the wide range of equipment you may use on a day-to-day basis. At a minimum, the equipment required when drawing blood includes gloves, alcohol or iodine to cleanse the area, a tourniquet, tubes, a tube holder, needles, tape, and gauze. A Phlebotomist should be completely aware of the wide range of needles, tubes, etc. that they may encounter in the field, including: Syringe – syringes are used to collect blood from patients with small or fragile veins. Another tool that can be used in these situations is a butterfly needle. Multi-sample blood collection needle – this device has two needles that are screwed into the holder. One needle is inserted into the vein while the vacuum blood collection tube is inserted into the holder and punctured by the needle on the other end of the tool. Tourniquet –…

Donated Blood: the Behind-the-Scenes Process

Categories: Phlebotomy

Thinking about donating blood? This safe, easy, and rewarding experience takes less than an hour – here is what you can expect. Making the appointment: First, when calling to make the appointment, you will be asked to verify that you are healthy, at least 110 pounds, and are at least 16 years old. It is also a good idea to let the blood bank know if you have recently traveled outside of the country or have any particular health concerns. Arrival and pre-screening: When you arrive and sign in, you will be asked to fill out the donor registration form and show your donor card or identification. During the pre-screening process, a blood bank employee will ask you some confidential questions about your health, lifestyle, and disease risk factors. You will take a short health exam, which includes getting your pulse, temperature, and blood pressure taken. A drop of blood…