Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: What You Need to Know

Categories: Nursing

What is a Psychiatric Nurse? Psychiatric-mental health nursing is challenging, rewarding, and a great benefit to the 18% of U.S. adults diagnosed with a mental illness. Psychiatric nurses are vital in helping to educate and care for these adult patients, as well as children and adolescents with psychiatric problems. According to the CDC, mental health disorders are the primary diagnosis for 60 million physician office visits and 6 million emergency department visits annually.

Oncology Nursing: What You Need to Know

Categories: Nursing

What is Oncology Nursing? An oncology nurse is a type of registered nurse who cares for patients diagnosed with cancer. Oncology nursing is a challenging, yet important role in the US, where the American Cancer Society estimates that 1.7 million new cancer cases were diagnosed in 2018. Cancer is the second leading of cause of death after heart disease. Oncology nursing is also a rapidly evolving field, with cancer therapies and technologies continually improving as new research and knowledge come to light.

Labor and Delivery Nursing: What You Need to Know

Categories: Nursing

What is a Labor and Delivery Nurse? Labor and delivery nurses are registered nurses who specialize in helping to deliver babies and support mothers and families immediately before, during, and after childbirth. Most labor and delivery nurses work in hospitals, while others work in clinical settings and birthing centers, or attend at-home births. A labor and delivery nurse may also be known as an L&D nurse, delivery nurse, or maternal-child nurse.

Pediatric Nursing: What You Need to Know

Categories: Nursing

What is a Pediatric Nurse? Pediatric nurses are registered nurses who care for children from infancy through to their late teen years. Pediatric nurses have specialized knowledge about the unique healthcare needs of young patients that continually change as their bodies develop and grow. Children and adolescent’s illnesses and their reactions to illnesses and injuries differ from adults, as do the treatments and equipment used in caring for them.

Neonatal Nursing: What You Need to Know

Categories: Nursing

What is a Neonatal Nurse? Neonatal nurses are registered nurses who provide round-the-clock care for vulnerable newborns. Neonatal nurses make a difference every day by helping high-risk, critically ill, or premature babies, while also supporting parents and other family members.